Chapter 2

Monthly Actions to Save $1,000

Many people in our society are not able to save.  They are barely able to cover their monthly expenses.  However, there are some actions that can help you get on a path to saving.

In the first month, open an online bank account and deposit a minimum amount, such as $5.  This is a very important first step.  In month two, save $15 (or more) in your online savings account.  One way to do this is with Paribus, an online tool that searches various retailers to determine if you are owed money for past purchases as a result of a price drop.

Your goal for month three is to work toward savings $100.  This could be accomplished by signing up with market research companies to participate in providing opinions. Or, you could try selling old items online. By consistently using various ideas for earning extra money, you should be able to save $100 a month.

For additional information on starting a savings program, click here.

Teaching Suggestions

  • Have students to talk various people to determine actions they take to reduce spending or earn extra money.
  • Have students create a summary presentation describing actions that might be taken to increase a person’s savings.

Discussion Questions 

  1. Describe attitudes and behaviors that might result in people not being able to save for the future.
  2. What are actions you have taken to reduce spending and to earn extra money for savings?
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Smart Money Moves for January

With a new year, many people hope to get a fresh start with changes in their financial planning activities. To do so, the following actions are suggested:

  • Maintain or increase the amount of money in your emergency fund.
  • Pay off high-interest credit cards and other expensive loan accounts.
  • Set goals that will contribute to long-term financial security.
  • Review your cash flow (spending and income) from the previous year in an effort to increase saving by avoiding unnecessary payments.
  • Merge various banking, investment, and retirement accounts into one low-cost account.
  • Determine if changes are needed in your estate plan.
  • Increase your retirement account contributions.
  • Revise your tax withholding, as needed

For additional information on January money moves, click here.

Teaching Suggestions

  • Have students talk to various people about which actions they believe to be most valuable for long-term financial security.
  • Have students create a brief presentation describing the value of one of these suggested money actions.

Discussion Questions 

  1. Describe the January money actions that you consider to be most valuable for long-term financial security.
  1. What are some other money moves that you would recommend?
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Learning How Money Works

 Many people grow up without learning how money works, which usually results in difficulties.  Studies reveal that less than one-fourth of millennials have basic financial knowledge.

A vital starting point in the learning process is admitting that you don’t know.  For example, most people do not know that credit scores show if a person has paid his or her bills on time and how much has been borrowed.  Most people are not aware that credit reports often contain incorrect information, or how to check for errors.

Credit card rewards may seem like a good deal but only is you pay your bill on time every month.  If you don’t, late fees and interest charges can more than outweigh any reward point benefits.

These are just two areas on which many young people, as well as others, lack a basic understanding. However, a wide variety of sources are available to add to your knowledge.

For additional information on learning how money works, click here.

Teaching Suggestions

  • Have students conduct research to determine the financial knowledge among various age groups.
  • Have students create a video presentation with suggestions for improving financial knowledge.

Discussion Questions 

  1. Why are people often not informed on basic money topics?
  2. What are the most common topics that on which many people lack basic financial knowledge?
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Financial Fears

According to the Northwestern Mutual Planning and Progress Study on financial well-being, Americans have several worries.  Based on interviews with 2,646 adults, 85 percent of respondents reported financial anxiety in some form.  Approximately two-thirds of those surveyed indicated that financial anxiety negatively affected their health.  In addition, 36 percent of those responding had increasing levels of financial anxiety over the past three years.

In the study, the greatest financial fears were:

  1. Having an unplanned emergency
  2. Having unplanned medical expenses
  3. Having insufficient savings for retirement
  4. Outliving retirement savings
  5. Becoming a financial burden
  6. Not able to afford healthcare
  7. Loss of a job
  8. Identity theft
  9. Extended unemployment
  10. Death/loss of primary wage earner
  11. Having poor credit
  12. Having to file bankruptcy
  13. Being a victim of a financial scam

To address these concerns, the study recommends the following actions:

  • build an emergency fund for unplanned expenses
  • invest properly for retirement and long-term financial security
  • review your finances regularly to revise goals and savings activities

These actions can help to reduce the financial anxiety reported by a large portion of Americans.

For additional information on financial anxiety, go to:

Link #1

Link #2

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Pokémon Go Can Cost You

Pokémon Go has resulted in a loss of money and other concerns.  In this popular game, users interact virtually with Pokémon characters placed in real world settings. The app is free to download, however there are in-app purchasing opportunities. Players are encouraged to pay for hints and tips for a competitive advantage.

In addition to financial losses, the Pokémon Go app has been used to lure robbery victims.  Other players have been robbed of their phones.  Police departments caution players to be aware of their surroundings.

Be warned that “free isn’t the same as no cost.”  Users may pay in the form of data use, legal confrontations, injuries, and reduced work productivity.  Higher insurance costs can also occur when playing the game while driving, which might result in an auto accident. Social concerns include disturbing church services and other occasions with players capturing creatures during the events.

For additional information on the cost of Pokémon Goclick here.

Teaching Suggestions

  • Have students suggest ways that an app game might be used for improved learning or assisting others in need.
  • Have students describe safety precautions when playing Pokémon Go.

Discussion Questions 

  1. Why are people attracted to the game, often with a personal or financial cost?
  2. What actions might be taken to avoid the financial and personal dangers of the game?
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Finances for Newlyweds

An estimated one-third of recently married couples are surprised by the financial situation of their spouse.  A similar number (36 percent) are not aware of their partner’s spending habits.  Based on a study by Experian Plc, only 40 percent knew the credit score of their partner.

Men more often hid money from spouses.  About 20 percent of men had secret bank accounts about which their partners didn’t know; compared to 12 percent of women. Regarding the maximum amount that they would spend before consulting with their spouse, men replied $1,259; women said $383.   Hidden financial information can have a significant adverse effect on the relationship of a newly married couple.

For additional information on newlywed finances, click here.

For additional information on the survey results, click here.

Teaching Suggestions

  • Have students survey newly-married people about their disclosure of financial information to their spouse.
  • Have students create a list of problems that might arise between newly-married people who do not inform their spouse about their personal financial information.

Discussion Questions 

  1. What financial information would be most important for newly-married people to disclose to their spouses?
  2. How could a lack of disclosure of financial information to a spouse create relationship difficulties?
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Ways to Reduce Environmental Impact and Save Money

To save money and help improve the environment, 20SomethingFinance.com suggests that you:

  • grow your own food and buy from local sources.
  • replace meat in meals with beans and vegetables.
  • bring your own containers to buy bulk items.
  • use refillable drink bottles.
  • ride a bike instead of driving.
  • use a low-flow showerhead.
  • sell items not being used; buy used items instead of new.

For additional information on saving the environment and money, click here.

Teaching Suggestions

  • Have students ask people to describe environmental-saving actions commonly used.
  • Have students create a promotional plan to create awareness of money-saving actions that are also environmental friendly.

Discussion Questions 

  1. What are benefits and drawbacks of environmental-saving actions?
  2. What factors might be considered when taking actions that save money and improve the environment?
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Newcomer Money Guides

While beneficiary, collateral, and fair market value are familiar to many, these terms can be especially confusing to those with limited English-language skills. In an attempt to assist various people, the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau has created the Newcomer’s Guides to Managing Money to provide recent immigrants with information about basic money decisions.  These guides offer brief suggestions to those who are new to the U.S. banking system.  The guides also include guidance for submitting and resolving problems with a financial product or service.

The Newcomer Guides include these topics:

  • Ways to receive your money, comparing cash, check, direct deposit, and debit cards.
  • Checklist for opening an account, to assist with starting a bank or credit union account.
  • Ways to pay your bills, providing guidance on whether to pay by check, debit card, credit card, or online.
  • Selecting financial products and services, providing assistance on deciding which financial services are right for various household situations.

Print copies of the guides can be ordered or downloaded. These publications are available to English and Spanish with additional languages to be offered in the future.

For additional information on money guides for newcomers:

Article #1
Article #2
Article #3

Teaching Suggestions

  • Have students ask people to create a list of financial planning terms that people find confusing.
  • Have students suggest methods to have people learn about confusing financial planning terms.

Discussion Questions 

  1. What financial problems might be encountered by people with limited English-language skills?
  2. What actions might be taken to assist various groups to better understand banking services and money management activities?
Categories: Bank Fees, Budget, Chapter 2, Chapter 4, Credit Cards, Debit Cards, Debt, Financial Services, Savings | Tags: , , | Leave a comment

Successful Financial Goals

Financial goals are communicated in many formats, and are good to have. However, too often, a goal is lacking the “why.”  While various financial planning actions are beneficial, quite often, little thought is given to the motivation behind a certain goal. Without this “why,” minimal internal motivation is likely to be present to see a goal to completion. The “why” of a financial goal will help you persevere when encountering challenges that could derail your achievement of a goal.

Not being able to answer the “why” may indicate that the goal is not worth your efforts. The “why” will also assure that a goal provides a higher level of satisfaction when it is achieved.  The process may require a series of “why” questions as you respond to the initial “why.”

Instead of being an afterthought, the “why” of your financial goals should be a driving force in creating and achieving these personal economic objectives. Be able to decide if a goal is a result of advertising, societal influences, or reflective thought about your personal financial situation. This action should result in meaningful goals rather than just efforts to accumulate more money or more stuff.

For additional information on financial goals, click here.

Teaching Suggestions

  • Have students talk to people to create examples of financial goals.
  • Have students ask a series of “why” questions to help other people to better focus their personal financial goals.

Discussion Questions 

  1. What are common motivations that influence personal financial goals?
  2. How might a person better understand the motivation behind personal financial goals?
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Low Gas Prices Are Set to Spur Holiday Spending

“Falling gas prices have put consumers in a good mood.”

According to a survey conducted by the National Association of Convenience Stores (NACS), more than 4 in 5 Americans indicate falling gas prices impact their feelings about the nation’s economy and as a result they will spend more during the upcoming holiday season.  In fact, more than one in four consumers (26 percent) expect to increase their spending during the 2015 holiday season–a 7-point jump over the past month and the highest percentage this year.  Also the survey finds that women are more optimistic than men.  For retailers, this statistic is even more encouraging because women do more holiday shopping when compared to men.

For more information, click here.

Teaching Suggestions

You may want to use the information in this blog post and the original article to

  • Discuss how holiday spending impacts a family’s budget.
  • Describe methods that consumers can use to save the money and budget for holiday spending.

Discussion Questions

  1. Does the price of gasoline affect your spending on other items such as food, clothing, medicine, luxury items, and gifts?
  2. How can you avoid spending “too much” during the holiday season?
  3. What steps can you take to save the money needed for gifts and other holiday expenses?
Categories: Budget, Chapter 2, Chapter 6, Economy, Purchasing Strategies, Wise Shopping | Tags: , , , | Leave a comment

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