Chapter_13

BUILDING WEALTH

A research study that surveyed over 10,000 millionaires resulted in the following findings to help guide others to achieve a comfortable financial security:

  • 79 percent of the respondents did not receive any inheritance; 80 percent were from families at or below a middle-class income level.
    Conclusion:Building wealth is within your control and doesn’t depend on being born into a rich family.
  • 33 percent never made more than $100,000 a year; 31 percent made around $100,000.
    Conclusion: Wise spending, saving, and investing are more important than your salary level.
  • 94 percent live on less than they make; 75 percent reported never having a credit card balance.  
    Conclusion: Stay out of debt and keep expenses below your income to build a financial foundation.
  • 75 percent of those in the study indicated consistent investing over a long period of time as the reason for their financial success; 80 percent invested in their company’s 401(k) plan; none said one individual stock investment was a big factor in their financial success. 
    Conclusion: You don’t need to find that one stock that will make you rich. Invest consistently in broad-market index funds over a long period of time.

88 percent of those who responded graduated from college, compared to 38 percent of the general population. And over half (52%) of the millionaires in the study earned a master’s or doctoral degree, compared to 13% of the general population. Almost two-thirds (62%) graduated from public state schools, while only 8 percent went to a prestigious private school.

Most of the 10,000 millionaires studied achieved their wealth through consistent investing, avoiding credit card debt, and smart spending, along with…no lottery tickets… no inheritances…no six-figure incomes…no lucky stock picks. 

Even when millionaires don’t have to worry about money anymore, they’re still careful about their spending. Over 80 percent reported using a grocery list in some format.

For additional information on building wealth, click here.

Teaching Suggestions

  • Have students talk to others to obtain information about actions they take to achieve long-term financial security.
  • Have students create an oral presentation or podcast that reports the findings of the study summarized in this article.

Discussion Questions 

  1. What actions do you believe to be most important for building wealth?
  2. Describe how you might communicate to others suggested actions for improved long-term financial security.
Categories: Chapter 1, Chapter 2, Chapter_11, Chapter_12, Chapter_13, Financial Planning | Tags: , , | Leave a comment

Personal Finance Simulations for Budgeting and Investing

Question:  What is a Personal Finance simulation? 

Answer:  A Personal Finance simulation allows students to fine-tune their decisions when they encounter real-life scenarios while taking a Personal Finance course. 

The authors of Personal Finance, 14e and Focus on Personal Finance, 7e have partnered with StockTrak.com to provide students with an interactive learning experience before they leave the classroom.   

The simulation that accompanies the Kapoor Personal Finance texts includes two components–a personal budgeting simulation and an investing simulation.

The Budgeting Simulation

  • Students assume the role of a full-time employee or part-time employee living on their own.
  • Over a virtual 12-month period, students review their estimated income and expenses, create monthly budgets and savings goals, and try to build an emergency fund. Each month takes about 20 minutes to complete.
  • Each month students manage their checking, savings, and credit card accounts as they deal with life’s expected and unexpected events that affect their budget.  
  • Within the simulation, additional personal finance tutorials are available to make sure students are learning about budgeting, banking, credit, employment, taxes, insurance, and more.
  • A class ranking based on net worth, credit score, and quality of life keep the students fully engaged and professors informed of each student’s progress.

The Investing Simulation

  • Students receive a virtual $25,000 in a brokerage account.
  • They can research U.S. stocks, ETFs, bonds and mutual funds and create their own investment portfolio.
  • All investment trades are based on real-time market prices.
  • Within the simulation, interactive tutorials help students get started and provide additional information during the simulation.
  • Students can monitor their performance versus their classmates.  At the same time, professors can track each student’s progress.

And BEST of ALL, with the new partnership between Stock-Trak and McGraw Hill, classes using the Kapoor Personal Finance textbook get a 50% savings when students register for the simulation – only $9.99 per student instead of retail price of $19.99.

Teaching Suggestions

  • Visit StockTrak.com/kapoor to learn more about the Personal Finance Budgeting and Investing Simulation.  You can learn even more by watching a short video or accessing the Kapoor demo materials located toward the bottom of the above site. 
  • It’s easy to get started.  All you need to do is access the above site, register your classes for Spring 2023, and indicate the dates you want your student to have access to the Personal Finance Simulation.  The site will generate a unique link for you to give to your students.
Categories: Budget, Chapter 1, Chapter 2, Chapter 3, Chapter 4, Chapter 5, Chapter 6, Chapter 7, Chapter 8, Chapter 9, Chapters, Chapter_10, Chapter_11, Chapter_12, Chapter_13, Chapter_14, Financial Planning Topics, Teaching Tools | Tags: , | Leave a comment

THE 33-33-33 PORTFOLIO

For decades, a 60/40 (60 percent stock, 40 percent bond) investment portfolio has been encouraged by financial advisors. However, we live in a new world, so in recent years a 33/33/33 allocation has been suggested, with investments divided equally among stocks, bonds, and alternatives. This shift in portfolio strategy is the result of unsustainable stock prices, looming inflation, and expected higher interest rates.  

The alternative investments include assets such as venture capital, real estate, private equity, private debt, commodities, and cryptocurrencies. These asset categories offer investors enhanced diversification, and have a low correlation with stocks to provide an inflation hedge. 

Real estate offers an opportunity for an improved yield for investors with a lower risk tolerance. Venture capital and private equity are suggested for investors comfortable with more risk.

Recent J.P. Morgan research revealed that an allocation of 30 percent of these alternatives can substantially increase annual returns, while strengthening portfolio stability and decreasing risk. However, these illiquid assets can’t be quickly sold, or liquidated, so careful cash-flow planning is also necessary.

Remember, every portfolio must be personalized to the needs of the individual based on liquidity need, risk tolerance, and the time horizon of financial goals.

For additional information on the 33/33/33 portfolio, go to the following articles.

Article #1

Article #2

Teaching Suggestions

  • Have students research alternative investments (venture capital, real estate, private equity, private debt, commodities, cryptocurrencies) to determine recent returns, risk, and suitability for their personal portfolio.
  • Have students create a visual proposal or video with a suggested investment portfolio for their current or future situation.

Discussion Questions 

  1. What factors should a person consider when planning an investment portfolio?
  2. Describe actions a person might take to determine if alternative investments are appropriate for their financial situation. 
Categories: Chapter_11, Chapter_12, Chapter_13, Financial Planning, Investments | Tags: | Leave a comment

Environmental, Social and Governance (ESG) Investing

An increasing number of investors are seeking a more ethical portfolio with an emphasis on socially responsible and sustainable investing. An emerging trend is environmental, social and governance (ESG) investing, with these factors used to evaluate the financial return and overall impact. 

The ESG score measures how investments and companies perform in these categories:

  • Environmental – carbon emissions, air and water pollution, deforestation, green energy initiatives, waste management, water usage
  • Social – employee gender and diversity, data security, customer satisfaction, company sexual harassment policies, human rights at home and around the world, fair labor practices
  • Governance – diversity of board members, political contributions, executive pay, large-scale lawsuits, internal corruption, lobbying

Many view “sustainable” investing as very vague. The ESG criteria hopes to provide a grading of investments that clarifies what sustainable involves. ESG scores are calculated using different methods. Some ratings are created by using data collected from company disclosures and government, academic and NGO databases. Other scores are developed with self-reported data from participating companies.

Recent benefits of ESG investing include higher returns and a lower downside risk than traditional funds and conventional investments.  To start investing, you can search on your own to identify an ESG fund or an individual stock with a high ESG score that fits your investment beliefs and goals.  Investors can also use a robo-advisor to guide their ESG investment choices.

For additional information on ESG investing, click on the following links:

Article #1

Article #2

Article #3

Teaching Suggestions

  • Have students search online to identify ESG funds or companies they might consider for their investment portfolio.
  • Have students talk with others to obtain the level of interest for ESG investing among potential investors of various ages.

Discussion Questions 

  1. What aspects of ESG investing do you find attractive?  What are your concerns?
  2. What concerns might be associated with methods used to create ESG scores?
Categories: Chapter_11, Chapter_12, Chapter_13, Investments, Mutual Funds, Stocks | Tags: , , | Leave a comment

Active Management. Good or Bad?

“Advisors and investors are increasingly focused more on lower fee products amid expectations that finding consistently strong performing active funds is hard.”

Passive investing (index funds and exchange traded funds) has been a trend on Wall Street for years.  So, what’s different?  The answer:  The trend is increasing at an alarming rate and investors are now retreating from actively managed funds that are beating their benchmark index.  According to data from Morningstar, investors pulled $99 billion from the actively managed funds that beat their benchmarks over a 12-month period ending January 31, 2017.  This is a remarkable trend given that most investors typically chase funds with high performance and high returns.

The reasons are many, and certainly lower fees is part of the reason, but not the only factor for this dramatic trend.  Another very important factor is that the number of managed funds that consistently beat the index over a long period of time is small.  According to data from Charles Schwab, the number of funds that score in the top 25% for at least two years is 1,098.  The number of funds drops to 702 at the end of three years, and to 33 funds at six years.  Only 4 funds score in the top 25% for at least seven years, and none stay in the top 25% for eight years.

The article goes on to say that this trend may encourage more actively managed funds to focus on bringing down the fees for their investment products in order to compete with the expense ratios for index funds and exchange traded funds.

For more information, click here.

Teaching Suggestions

You may want to use the information in this blog post and the original article to

  • Discuss the difference between index funds, ETFs, and managed funds.
  • Reinforce how important fees and performance are when choosing a mutual fund.

Discussion Questions

  1. What is the difference between a managed fund, an index fund, and an exchange traded fund?
  2. Which type of fund do you think could help you obtain your investment goals? Why?
Categories: Chapter_13 | Tags: , | Leave a comment

Robo Investment Advice

With many investors already making their own trades online, investment companies believe that robo advisors have these additional benefits:

  • lower costs for obtaining advice and conducting transactions.
  • an ability to adjust the portfolio for tax purposes by selling shares that have declined to offset gains.
  • an easier investment approach for younger clients with less-complicated financial lives.

Some will be concerned about automated portfolio management.  Human advisors will still be available to address issues about mortgages, insurance, estate planning, retirement income, and other topics that robo-advisers are not yet equipped to answer.

For additional information on robo advice, click on the following articles:

Article #1
Article #2
Article #3

Teaching Suggestions

  • Have students ask people to describe the process they use to select investments.
  • Have students create a framework to analyze when using robo advice might be appropriate for an investor.

Discussion Questions 

  1. What are benefits and drawbacks of robo advice?
  2. What factors might be considered when using robo advice for investment decisions?
Categories: Bonds, Chapter_11, Chapter_12, Chapter_13, Financial Services, Investments, Mutual Funds, Stocks | Tags: , , , , | Leave a comment

Mutual Fund Rankings, 2015

“If a bull market must continually climb a wall of worry, then the current bull, which started more than six years ago, should be on the brink of exhaustion.”

As a preamble to Kiplinger’s 2015 Mutual Fund Rankings, this article describes the concerns that investors have about interest rates, corporate earnings, the economy, political upheaval, and other factors that could impact not only mutual fund investments, but all investments and the U.S. and the world economy.

In addition the article also provides links to Kiplinger’s Mutual Fund Finder tool and specific information about the top-performing mutual funds including large-company stock funds, midsize-company stock funds, small-company stock funds, hybrid funds, large-company foreign stock funds, small- and midsize foreign stock funds, global stock funds, diversified emerging-market funds, regional and single-country funds, sector funds, and alternative funds.

For more information, click here.  

Teaching Suggestions

You may want to use the information in this blog post and the original article to

  • Remind students that there are many factors that can affect mutual fund investments.
  • Show students how to use the link to the Kiplinger Mutual Fund Finder tool that is described in the article.
  • Stress the importance of a long-term investment program–especially when planning for retirement.

Discussion Questions

  1. Assuming you believe there is a strong possibility the value of your mutual funds will decrease over the next 12 months, would you sell your funds or would you hold them? Explain your answer.
  2. Depending on your answer to the above question, what factors did you consider to help make your decision?
  3. Pick one fund you believe could help obtain your investment goals. Then use the Kiplinger Mutual Fund Finder to research the fund. Based on the information, would you still want to invest in this fund.
Categories: Chapter_13, Investments, Mutual Funds, Retirement Planning, Savings | Tags: , , | Leave a comment

How to Open a Mutual Fund Account at a Brokerage Firm

“It’s easy to figure out the right type of account—just start with what you’re saving for.”

Too often, investors want to invest, but they don’t know where to start.  While most investment companies and brokerage firms make it as easy as possible to open an account and begin investing, for many would-be investors opening an account is confusing and often traumatic.

The link below describes a practical approach that helps would-be investors to begin investing at Vanguard—one of the largest and most successful companies in the investment world.  Note:  The link below provides information for Vanguard, but other investment companies and brokerage firms provide similar information on their websites.  At the Vanguard site, there is basic information about mutual funds.  Then specific information about fees and no-load funds is included in the section “Discover Vanguard’s Advantages.”  Next, there is a section on choosing the right fund.  Then, information about different types of investment accounts is provided.  Finally, there is a 3-step process that can be used to open an account.

For more information, click here.

Teaching Suggestions

You may want to use the information in this blog post and the original article to

  • Remind students of the advantages of beginning to invest sooner rather than later.
  • Visit the Vanguard (or other investment or brokerage firm websites) for more information.
  • Encourage students to open a mutual fund investment account when they have saved the money needed to begin an investment program.

Discussion Questions

  1. Why do you think people are reluctant to begin investing?
  2. Even though investment companies and brokerage firms make the process as easy as possible, people are often “afraid” to open an account and begin investing. How can you overcome this fear?
Categories: Chapter_13, Investments, Mutual Funds | Tags: , | Leave a comment

Basics of Investing in Mutual Funds

“. . . Learn how to invest in mutual funds with these informative tips.”

This Money/CNN article provides the following 10 statements along with a brief explanation of each statement to help beginning investors learn about fund investing.

  1. What exactly is a mutual fund?
  2. Mutual funds make it easy to diversify.
  3. There are many kinds of stock funds.
  4. Bond funds come in many different flavors too.
  5. Returns aren’t everything – also consider the risk taken to achieve those returns.
  6. Low expenses are crucial.
  7. Taxes take a big bite out of performance.
  8. Don’t chase winners.
  9. Index funds should be a core component of your portfolio.
  10. Don’t be too quick to dump a fund.

For more information, click here. 

Teaching Suggestions

You may want to use the information in this blog post and the original article to

  • Provide an introduction to the “basics” of mutual fund investing.
  • Point out that this is just one article in the Money/CNN series. By clicking on the next button at the bottom of this article, students can access more articles and obtain more in-depth information about fund investing.

Discussion Questions

  1. Based on the information in this article, why do you think investors choose mutual funds?
  2. The article mentions that there are both stock and bond funds. What is the difference between these two types of funds?  Which type of funds do you think could help you achieve your financial goals?
  3. Why are taxes and expenses important when you choose a mutual fund?
Categories: Chapter_13, Investments, Mutual Funds | Tags: , | Leave a comment

3 Simple Steps to Check Up on Your Mutual Funds

By using three simple steps, you can evaluate when to buy, and when to sell mutual fund shares.

This short article describes three simple steps that investors can use to monitor the value of their fund investments.

Step 1:  Go to www.morningstar.com or look up funds via the Kiplinger fund finder tool at www.kiplinger.com, and check out 1-year, 5-year, and 10-year returns.

Step 2:  Compare your fund’s performance with the average returns for similar funds or with an appropriate benchmark like the Russell 2000 index for small company stock funds.

Step 3:  If your fund’s performance doesn’t match up with similar funds or with a specific fund benchmark, dig deeper to see if the fund managers have changed their strategy or if there are reasons why the fund is a poor performer.

While the above steps can identify funds that you may want to sell, the same three steps can also help you identify funds that you want to hold or even buy more shares in a top performing fund.

For more information go to http://www.kiplinger.com/article/investing/T041-C009-S002-3-simple-steps-to-check-up-on-mutual-funds.html

Teaching Suggestions

You may want to use the information in this blog post and the original article to

  • Explain how easy it is to use the Internet to obtain information from Morningstar, Kiplinger, and other sources that can help investors evaluate a fund’s performance.
  • Discuss ways investors can monitor the value of fund investments.

Discussion Questions

  1. How can a fund’s performance help you determine if you want to sell shares or buy more shares in a fund?
  2. Why should investors examine a fund’s performance over different time periods?
  3. In addition to performance, what other factors should be considered when evaluating a fund investment?
Categories: Chapter_13, Investments, Mutual Funds | Tags: | Leave a comment

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