Chapter_12

Procter & Gamble’s Allen Lafley on Activist Investors’ Watch List

“With most of the Dow 30 companies up for the year, investors should be heartened that P&G remains in the ‘bargain bin.'”

In this article, Marc Courtenay describes the financial information investors can use to evaluate an investment in Procter & Gamble, a large global company with a worldwide customer base of 4.8 billion people.  Information in this article includes a discussion of P&G’s

  • Efforts to reduce costs by $10 billion.
  • Current stock price and future price predictions.
  • Decision to increase its dividends to stockholders.
  • Projections for earnings growth and the anticipated effect on the stock’s share value.

For more information go to  http://www.thestreet.com/story/12766334/1/procter-gambles-alan-lafley-on-activist-investors-watch-list.html

Teaching Suggestions

You may want to use the information in this blog post and the original article to

  • Stress the importance of using financial information when evaluating a corporate stock for investment purposes.
  • Discuss how financial information (dividends, earnings per share, dividend payout, etc.) relate to the share value for a stock like P&G.

Discussion Questions

  1. Because P&G is a large global company with a customer base of 4.8 billion people and is a component in the Dow Jones Industrial Average, do investors still need to evaluate the company before investing in its stock?
  2. Why are financial measures like dividends, earnings per share, dividend payout, and projections for earnings growth important when evaluating a stock investment?
Categories: Chapter_12, Stocks | Tags: , , , | Leave a comment

7 Smart Investing Tips from Kiplinger Readers

7 Smart Investing Tips from Kiplinger Readers

Each of the seven tips described below can help both experienced and beginning investors improve their investment skills.

  1. Invest in what you understand. To avoid getting caught in a stock-market bubble and to remain calm during an economic downturn, you should know something about a company’s true worth.
  2. Less debt means less risk. Look closely at a company’s balance sheet to determine if a company has too much debt that could hamper the company’s growth or ability to weather an economic storm.
  3. Use dividends to diversify your stock holdings. Instead of reinvesting dividends in the same stock, take cash dividends and use the money to buy stocks in different companies in which you have few holdings.
  4. If you use funds, look under the hood. To diversify your investments, make sure your existing funds don’t own the same stocks in the same companies.
  5. The right stock can replace a bond. Look for high-yield, dividend stocks to replace all or a portion of your bond holdings.
  6. Cash isn’t trash. Cash can be used to take advantage of stock-market downturns or corrections.
  7. Patience is a virtue. Sometimes it just takes time for a stock to increase in value.

For more information go to http://kiplinger.com/printstory.php?pid=12565

Teaching Suggestions

You may want to use the information in this blog post and the original article to

  • Encourage students to evaluate all potential stock or mutual fund investments.
  • Stress the importance of patience and the value of a long-term investment program.

Discussion Questions

  1. How can these seven tips improve your investment decisions?
Categories: Chapter_12, Chapter_13, Investments, Mutual Funds | Tags: , | Leave a comment

Apple and Google Show that Stock Splits Are Cool Again

Now that Apple and Google split their stock, expect the thin pool of high-priced stocks to follow suit.

Can a stock’s price be “too high?” Good question. When Google split its stock in 2014, the share price had broken through the $1,000 ceiling. After a 2-for-1 stock split, Google’s price per share dropped and left only four stocks trading for more than $1,000 a share.

Most companies split their stock to lower the share price which will “hopefully” make their stock more attractive to investors. In reality, many investors prefer to buy 100 shares of a $20 stock rather than buy 20 shares of a $100 stock. These same investors believe a stock has more potential for a dollar increase if the share price is lower rather than higher.

This article also points out a basic reason why investors don’t profit from the actual stock split. If an investor, for example, owned 100 shares of Apple stock priced at $630 on the day before the recent 7-for-1 split, the investor would own 700 shares of stock after the split, but the price drops to $90 per share. A $63,000 investment before the split is still worth $63,000 after the split.

For more information go to

http://www.dailyfinance.com/2014/04/29/apple-google-stock-splits-cool-again/

Teaching Suggestions

You may want to use the information in this blog post and the original article to:

  • Discuss why companies split their stock.
  • Explain the effect of a stock split on a company’s market capitalization. (Market capitalization = a company’s share price x the number of shares outstanding.)

Discussion Questions

1. Why do corporations split their stock?

2. Once a company’s stock does split, the price may increase or decrease in value. After the 7-for-1 stock split, what happened to the share price of Apple stock?

3. Besides “possible” increase in value caused by a stock split, what other factors account for an increase or decrease in a company’s stock price?

Categories: Chapter_12, Investments, Stocks | Tags: , , | Leave a comment

Stock Investing at Lower Risk: A Guide for Beginners

Here’s a simple breakdown of key points for investing in stocks

For the beginner, stock investing can seem like an uncharted mine field because of terms, regulations, and fear. This article provides five important pieces of information that can help students understand stocks and become better investors. Here goes:

  1. Owning stock is owning a company. As an owner, you have rights and responsibilities.
  2. Stocks grow two ways because they can increase in value and they pay dividends.
  3. Stocks rise and fall in value. Keep in mind what goes up can come down.
  4. You will pay taxes unless your stocks are held inside some type of tax deferred retirement account.
  5. Stocks can be volatile. Volatility is different than the typical rise and fall in price described above because volatility occurs when an investment has major price swings in a short period of time.

For more information go to

http://www.forbes.com/sites/mitchelltuchman/2013/08/09/stock-investing-at-lower-risk-a-guide-for-beginners/

Teaching Suggestions

You may want to use the information in this blog post and the original article to

  • Provide basic information to students who are studying stock for the first time.
  • Help students understand the process of stock investing.
  • Compare stocks with savings accounts, certificates of deposit, bonds, mutual funds, and other investment alternatives.

Discussion Questions

  1. How can you profit from a stock investment?
  2. What are the risks associated with stock investments?
  3. How can you avoid paying taxes on stock and other investment alternatives?
Categories: Chapter_12, Chapter_14, Investments, Retirement Planning | Tags: , , | Leave a comment

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