Savings

New rules for Reverse Mortgages

The most popular reverse mortgage program is the Home Equity Conversion Mortgage (HECM), which is insured by Housing and Urban Development (HUD).

New rules from HUD add protections for certain surviving spouses after the death of a reverse mortgage borrower.   Until recently, if the non-borrower spouse was not on the loan, he or she was not entitled to remain in the property following the death of the borrower.  But under HUD’s new rules, non-borrowing, surviving spouse can remain in the home if specific conditions are met.  These changes apply to reverse mortgage loans in which the borrowing spouse applied for a reverse mortgage before August 2014.  In addition, the couple must have resided in the property as their principal residence throughout the duration of the HECM, and taxes, property insurance and any other special assessments that may be required by local or state law must have been paid.

The concern regarding non-borrowing spouses has been a source of many reverse mortgage issues.  Here’s why: The amount of money a reverse mortgage borrower can draw is based in part on the age of the youngest borrower—and unless all borrowers are 62 or over, they would not qualify for a reverse mortgage.

For more information:

Consumer Advisory

Reverse Mortgage Information

Teaching Suggestions

  • Ask students to comment on the statement: “While a reverse mortgage can be used to supplement monthly income, some borrowers may face unintended obstacles and consequences”. What might be those consequences?
  • Are the new rules from HUD effective in protecting senior citizens? Why or why not?

Discussion Questions

  1. Why should you talk to a qualified professional before deciding to get a reverse mortgage?
  2. Where can you find HUD-approved HECM Counseling Agencies near you?
Categories: Chapter 7, Financing a Home, Retirement Planning, Savings | Tags: , | Leave a comment

A Look at Reverse Mortgages

Every day, approximately 10,000 people in the United States turn age 62, according to the Census Bureau.  And if they are homeowners, they may be eligible to borrow against a portion of the equity in their house by using a loan called a “reverse mortgage.”

The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB) is warning consumers about potentially misleading reverse mortgage advertising.  In June 2015, the CFPB issued a consumer advisory stating that many television, radio, print and Internet advertisements for reverse mortgages had “incomplete and inaccurate statements used to describe the loans”.  In addition, most of the important loan requirements were often buried in fine print if they were even mentioned at all.  These advertisements may leave older homeowners with the false impression that reverse mortgage loans are a risk-free solution to financial gaps in retirement.” For example, the CFPB said, “After looking at a variety of ads, many homeowners we spoke to didn’t realize reverse mortgage loans need to be repaid.”

For more information, click here.

Teaching Suggestions

  • Visit the website of the American Association of Retired Person (AARP) at aarp.org. Locate the AARP Home Equity Information Center, which presents facts about reverse mortgages.  Then prepare a report on how reverse mortgages work.
  • Ask students to visit Fannie Mae’s website at fanniemae.com/homebuyer to find out who is eligible for reverse mortgages, and what other choices are available to borrowers.

Discussion Questions

  1. Why should you consult a qualified professional before you decide to get a reverse mortgage?
  2. Where can you find Housing and Urban Development-approved Home Equity Conversion Mortgage counseling agencies near you?
Categories: Chapter 7, Home Buying, Retirement Planning, Savings | Tags: , | Leave a comment

Mutual Fund Rankings, 2015

“If a bull market must continually climb a wall of worry, then the current bull, which started more than six years ago, should be on the brink of exhaustion.”

As a preamble to Kiplinger’s 2015 Mutual Fund Rankings, this article describes the concerns that investors have about interest rates, corporate earnings, the economy, political upheaval, and other factors that could impact not only mutual fund investments, but all investments and the U.S. and the world economy.

In addition the article also provides links to Kiplinger’s Mutual Fund Finder tool and specific information about the top-performing mutual funds including large-company stock funds, midsize-company stock funds, small-company stock funds, hybrid funds, large-company foreign stock funds, small- and midsize foreign stock funds, global stock funds, diversified emerging-market funds, regional and single-country funds, sector funds, and alternative funds.

For more information, click here.  

Teaching Suggestions

You may want to use the information in this blog post and the original article to

  • Remind students that there are many factors that can affect mutual fund investments.
  • Show students how to use the link to the Kiplinger Mutual Fund Finder tool that is described in the article.
  • Stress the importance of a long-term investment program–especially when planning for retirement.

Discussion Questions

  1. Assuming you believe there is a strong possibility the value of your mutual funds will decrease over the next 12 months, would you sell your funds or would you hold them? Explain your answer.
  2. Depending on your answer to the above question, what factors did you consider to help make your decision?
  3. Pick one fund you believe could help obtain your investment goals. Then use the Kiplinger Mutual Fund Finder to research the fund. Based on the information, would you still want to invest in this fund.
Categories: Chapter_13, Investments, Mutual Funds, Retirement Planning, Savings | Tags: , , | Leave a comment

Retirement Can’t Wait

A few decades ago, Americans had a pretty solid three-legged retirement stool.  Social Security and personal savings combined with traditional pensions led to good middle-class retirements for millions.  But today’s stool is a little too wobbly to support that lifestyle for coming generations of workers and retirees.  The Great Recession shows all of us just how vulnerable 401(k) type plans and IRAs can be, and with the savings rates dangerously low, the need to strengthen the system is clear.  Today, workers are largely responsible for their own retirement investments.  The days of a defined benefit pension that you couldn’t outlive are a thing of the past.  Today, we have to take greater ownership for starting our savings, managing and then figuring out how much to draw in retirement.

Most workers need advice on how to invest their 401(k) and IRA savings.  Too often, that advice is not delivered in the customer’s best interest.  The Labor Department is working with the financial services industry, consumer groups and Members of Congress to come up with a plan that protects retirement savings from financial conflicts of interest.

For more information, click here.

Teaching Suggestions

  • Ask students to analyze their current assets and liabilities for retirement planning.
  • Will your students’ spending patterns change during retirement?
  • What are the basic steps in retirement planning?

Discussion Questions

  1. Why is retirement planning so important for today’s workers?
  2. Can you depend on Social Security and your company pension to pay for your basic living expenses in retirement? Why or why not?
  3. Why is it important to start early for a secure retirement?
Categories: Chapter_14, Financial Planning, Investments, Retirement Planning, Savings | Tags: , , | Leave a comment

Many Americans Have No Savings

About three in ten Americans have no emergency savings, according to a study conducted by Bankrate.com. This number has increased in recent years, mainly due to the lack of growth in household income. Without an emergency fund, people tend to encounter even greater financial difficulties. A person will often use high-interest debt to cover unexpected expenses. In addition to the 29 percent with no savings, another 21 percent have less than three months worth of expenses saved.

For additional information on emergency savings, click here.

Teaching Suggestions

  • Have students ask several people who their might cope with a financial emergency.
  • Have students create a plan for creating a emergency savings fund.

Discussion Questions 

  1. What are methods that might be used to cope with a financial emergency?
  2. How might a person be encouraged to create an emergency fund?
Categories: Budget, Chapter 1, Chapter 2, Financial Planning, Retirement Planning, Savings | Tags: , | Leave a comment

Personal Finance Stress Test

To avoid financial disaster, several measurements are available for assessing a person’s personal financial stress:

  1.  The Debt-to-Income Ratio is obtained by dividing your debts by pretax earnings.  Generally this number should be less than 28 percent, without your mortgage, or 36 percent, including your mortgage payment.
  2.  Discretionary Expenses involve spending for items other than fixed obligations and variable nondiscretionary items, such as food and utilities. Purely discretionary expenses may involve recreation and vacations.  An analysis of these categories will allow you to delay, reduce, or eliminate various expenses to avoid financial difficulties.
  3. Emergency Savings should be able to cover three to nine months of living expenses. These funds should be readily available in savings or other easily liquidated accounts. Greater financial greater obligations will require a larger emergency fund.
  1. Additional Income involving wages or tips from a part-time job or selling personal possessions can provide a cushion in times of financial difficulty.
  1. Total Assets, both liquid and non-liquid, will reduce your vulnerability to financial turmoil.

For additional information on the personal finance stress test, click here.

Teaching Suggestions

  • Have students calculate one or more of these measurements for their life situation.
  • Have students prepare a short creative video with a summary of these measurements.

Discussion Questions 

  1. Why is liquidity important for reduced financial stress?
  2. What actions would you recommend to for a person to reduce their personal financial stress?
Categories: Chapter 1, Chapter 3, Financial Planning, Savings | Tags: , , | Leave a comment

Saver Survey

Each year, America Saves (www.americasaves.org) conducts a survey or its program participants to determine the attitudes and behaviors of savers.  The most recent study reports that:

  • People save mainly for their emergency fund, retirement, or repaying debt.
  • People in formal savings programs, such as America Saves, report saving larger amounts.
  • Married respondents saved much more than single respondents.
  • Females and males have different saving purposes; females favored saving for an emergency fund, males favored retirement saving.
  • Savers involved in America Saves are saving more, are more confident in their ability to manage their money, and are managing their debt better while feeling more optimistic about their financial situation.

The complete Savers Survey report is available here.

Teaching Suggestions

  • Have students talk to others about their savings habits and goals.
  • Have students prepare a graph to monitor their savings activities.

Discussion Questions 

  1. What actions can help encourage a person to have more effective savings habits?
  2. Why does being involved in an organized savings program result in more savings and better money management activities?
Categories: Chapter 1, Chapter 4, Financial Planning, Savings | Tags: , | Leave a comment

Financial Flowerpots

Many devices are used for effective money management.  One is called “the financial flowerpot system,” with each imaginary pot representing an account where you “plant” the funds for achieving a financial goal.  When you direct money into this account, it’s like watering and feeding your goal.

To fill up the “financial flowerpots,” start a regular saving and investing plan with the money automatically withdrawn from your paycheck or bank account.  This automatic savings plan may be viewed as an automatic watering system for an actual flowerpot.

Three main flowerpots are recommended:

1.  The Solutions Flowerpot is the emergency fund.  These funds are available to solve problems and have a financial cushion, giving you financial peace of mind.

2. The Retirement Flowerpot is to save for your future financial independence.

3. The College Flowerpot is for those who are saving for their children’s education or for their own advanced studies in the future.

Smaller flowerpots may be used for other financial goals.  For each flowerpot, set aside a savings amount each month that will grow to your desired goal in the timeframe you set.

For additional information on financial flowerpots, click here.

Teaching Suggestions

  • Have students obtain information from others about the methods used to achieve financial goals.
  • Have students propose a method they might use to achieve a financial goal.

Discussion Questions 

1. What are the benefits of thinking of savings goals as financial flowerpots?
2. What are other potential savings goals for various household situations?

Categories: Chapter 1, Chapter 2, Financial Planning, Savings | Tags: , | Leave a comment

Saving Your Tax Refund

The average federal income refund for this year was nearly $2,900, resulting in tens of billions of dollars ready for use. Instead of spending those funds, financial advisors recommend saving for an emergency fund, retirement, or other household goals.  Currently, these refunds represent an amount larger than the average annual personal savings rate of most Americans. Spending the refund on things you don’t need often results in reduced future financial security.

Also, consider reducing your withholding throughout the year.  The refund you receive is only getting back money you lent the government over the past year at zero per cent interest.  Instead, have an automatic withdrawal sent to your savings each month.

For additional information on saving your tax refund, click here.

Teaching Suggestions

  • Have students conduct a survey of people to determine how tax refunds are used..
  • Have students prepare an analysis of lost interest/earnings by taxpayers who received a large refund each year.

Discussion Questions 

  1. What are the benefits of receiving a large tax refund?
  2. What are the drawbacks of receiving a large tax refund?
Categories: Chapter 4, Chapter 5, Savings, Taxes | Tags: , | Leave a comment

Protecting Your Retirement Pension

Pension advance lenders offer retirees and veterans a loan or cash advances in exchange for all or part of their pension payments.  Paying back the advance or loan, plus the high interest and fees that such loans typically include, could threaten older Americans’ retirement security.

If you are considering a pension advance, follow these do’s and don’ts:

  • If you are asked to sign up for life insurance with the pension advance, you could end up paying the insurance premium.
  • If you are resorting to pension advances due to financial difficulties, consider getting financial coaching or counseling from a professional.
  • Don’t be fooled by patriotic-sounding names, logos, or claims of government backing.
  • Don’t give anyone access or control over your monthly pension payments.

For additional information, and learn more, click here.

Teaching Suggestions

  • Ask students to research local non-profit credit counseling agencies and what services they provide.
  • Why is it important not to give anyone access or control over your monthly pension payment?

Discussion Questions

  1. Why do people resort to pension advance loans?
  2. What are other alternatives to pension advance loans?
  3. What recommendation should you take to protect your retirement pension when considering an advance?
Categories: Chapter 5, Retirement Planning, Savings | Tags: , , | Leave a comment

Blog at WordPress.com.